WaterJet- Industrial Cleaning Conference- Safety

2011 Waterjet and Industrial-Municipal Cleaning Association

SAFETY and OPERATIONAL PRACTICES FOR WATERJETTING, HYDROBLASTING, WATER

BLASTING, Pressure Washing.

The WJTA_ IMCA WaterJet Technology Association-Industrial & Municipal

Cleaning Association is holding their biannual conference and Expo of

September 19-21, 2011 at the George R Brown Convention Center in Houston

TX.

Plan to attend if you are cleaning anything from sewage, to parking lots,

to bridges, or cutting with water- at all pressures, or if you use

vaccuum trucks in your business.

There are workshops, boot camps, and live demonstrations as well as the

largest global exhibition for waterjet and water blast equipment.

If you are using waterblasters, pressure washers, or waterjetting

equipment, you should have on site

1. Recommended Practices for the US of High Pressure Waterjetting

Equipment

-available in English and Spanish.

2. Video or cd- Waterjetting Equipment- 30 minutes

3. Medical alert cards for each person on site.

4. Recommended Practices for the Use of Industrial Vacuum Equipment

5. Video or cd- Vacuum Equipment.

Contact the Advisory Council if you would like a general Operations

Module. It contains the WJTA Video and “Recommended Practices,” some

suggested personnel safety policies that are specific to waterjetting

and not covered in current OSHA regulations, five laminated cards for

individual workers, and some suggested topics for in-house training

courses for your workers.

This Advisory Council module does not contain a self-help, self-testing

text. It is not a certification procedure. Pressure Washing and

Waterjetting are used in so many different applications that the general

training course would need to be customized for site specific projects.

Handy Table on Surface Contamination

NAVY SEA Systems Command
Materials Engineering Group
Codes SEA 03M12.5
2531 Jefferson Davis Highway
Arlington, VA 22242-5160

Soluble Substances Table 1  (P & W Hand Held Hydroblast Unit)
[table=1]
  Total Sample Area  (cm2) 112.5
 Total µg/ cm2   2.61
 Chloride µg/ cm2  0.85

Soluble Substances Table 2 (ABB Hand Held Grit Blast Unit)
[table=3] 
 Total Sample  Area (cm2) 50
 Total µg/ cm2   120.71
 Chloride  µg/ cm2  62.55

Inspection Manual for Flash Rust

Inspection Manual for Flash RustSupplement to Standard Photograph Guides
Supplement to VIS-4

December 29, 2008

Prepared for
Advanced Technology Institute
SSA: No. 2008-326

Prepared by
Lydia M. Frenzel, Ph.D.
Fat Squirrel 22, LLC
On behalf of
Project Participants:
Todd Pacific Shipyard- Lead Shipyard

Project Goals and Objective:


This document is a supplement to SSPC-VIS No. 4 NACE VIS 7 (or ISO 8501-4).

SSPC-VIS No. 4 NACE VIS 7, ISO 8501-4, International Paint Hydroblasting photos, and Hempel photos do not illustrate: 1. an example of lightly wiping; 2. an example of the surface after excess flash rust with loose rust dust has been mitigated by pressure washing.

For this manual, “Flash Rust” is the rust that occurs from the time the waterjet (WJ) or wet abrasive blast (WAB) cleaning process starts to the time the water used for the cleaning process dries. Flash rust often looks like a rust bloom.

Look at SSPC-VIS No. 4 NACE VIS 7, ISO 8501-4, and NACE No. 5- SSPC- SP-12 for a more detailed definition of flash rust.

“Rust-Back” is used in dry abrasive blast standards. Rust-Back occurs on surfaces that appear to be dry. Rust Back is the rust that occurs when DRY, bare steel is exposed to conditions of high humidity, moisture, or a corrosive atmosphere.

“Rust Bloom” is somewhat uniform rust spread evenly over a large section of the surface. Rust Bloom is a generic description. The observer doesn’t know if it originates from flash rust or rust-back.

Coatings manufacturers will designation the level of Flash Rust that is acceptable for the coating in a specific environment.

How much “Flash Rust” is formed is directly related to time of wetness. Engineering controls and project scheduling are key in reducing the time of wetness. Look at Blast and Dry, Clean Blasting, and Drying Effects.mpg

Inspecting for “Flash rust” is not rocket science.
It is deceptively simple or deceptively hard, because the decision is subjective.
? Prior to painting, look at the rust bloom on the steel.
? Find out the environmental history-if there was rain, pressure washing, waterjet cleaning, or no water involved at all.
? If there is no water involved, you reject the “Rust-Back.”
? If there is water involved in the surface cleaning, you place VIS-4 up to the surface nest to the rust and make an initial judgment concerning light, moderate, and heavy.
? If necessary, you wipe the “Flash Rust” to continue the determination between light, moderate, and heavy.
? Be consistent in the determination methods.
? Mitigate the flash rust to the amount required by the project specifications.

This manual does not address whether or not the amount of flash rust is suitable for coatings. Coatings manufacturers DO NOT recommend painting over HEAVY flash rust. The coatings must wet to the substrate, consolidate the dust, and be thick enough to cover the rust dust.

SSPC, NACE, ISO and Coatings Manufacturers published several guides to “Flash Rust” with photos.
All guides are to be used in the same manner. All lead to the same answer!

Download this manual here:

[download id=”5″]